New UK Charlie Chaplin Discs from Artificial Eye


Charlie Chaplin Competition: Win Artificial Eye Blu-rays and DVDs!


  • It must be that time of year already: ol’ Charlie’s 1918–1957 films are being re-released on Blu-ray and DVD yet again
  • There’s a big difference this time: the rest of his features are making their debut in HD

As explained in the Charlie Chaplin Collectors’ Guide Part 7, the distribution rights for his First National/United Artists/Attica-Archway output come up for renewal in different countries on a regular basis. This time it’s the turn of Artificial Eye (home video)/Curzon Film World (theatrical) in the UK. In fact, they’ll be the fourth distributors of his films domestically within the past two decades!

The Chaplin Revue (1959) US lobby card 5. Charlie Chaplin, Edna Purviance; including A Dog's Life, Shoulder Arms (both 1918), The Pilgrim (1923). Edna, Charlie, Scraps

It’s A Dog’s Life for Edna, Charlie and Scraps

LATEST: A Countess from Hong Kong (1967) is now available on Blu-ray!

Each film will be issued separately on Blu-ray and DVD. An educated guess says that these new releases will be more-or-less rehashed versions of the definitive mk2/Warner DVDs, as per the efforts of the previous distributor, Park Circus, but you never know: Artificial Eye may yet surprise us.

One piece of exciting news is that this marks the worldwide HD/Blu-ray début of The Chaplin Revue (a 1959 re-edited re-release of A Dog’s Life, Shoulder Arms and The Pilgrim), alongside the rest of the First National Shorts (19181923) in HD. Of course they’ll still only be the ‘Daddy’ versions but that’s another story. This will also make the UK only the second country in the world, after Denmark, to release all of Chaplin’s features on Blu-ray. Up until now, A Woman of Paris, Monsieur Verdoux, Limelight and A King in New York have been unavailable here in HD. Here’s the updated release schedule; several dates have been pushed back from those originally announced in April:



I started Brenton Film because I love film – quelle surprise! The silent era, 1930s and 1940s especially get my literary juices flowing though. So you’ll see a lot about those. For more, see this site’s About page.

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